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Porting an OpenGL application to the web

Emscripten is a tool which compiles C/C++ applications to Javascript, which can then be run inside a web page in a browser.  I have started to work on adding an OpenGL translation layer which is based on WebGL.  The goal of this project is to make it possible to compile OpenGL C/C++ applications into Javascript which uses WebGL to draw the 3D scenes.

My first demo is a port of the es2gears application to the web.  es2gears is an OpenGL ES 2.0 port of the well-known glxgears application.  You can see the web port of es2gears in action if you’re using a WebGL enabled browser (Firefox, Chrome or Opera Next).  For some extra fun, press the arrow keys as the gears are animating!

Screenshot of the es2gears application

This port has been automatically generated from this version of es2gears.  If you want to play with this locally, you can fork the emscripten repository.

A note about the demo: this is not supposed to be a performance benchmark of any kind.  My GLUT implementation uses the requestAnimationFrame API if available which means that your rendering speed should be capped at about 60FPS.  And that is what you would get if you compile es2gears directly into a native application as well.  But this application doesn’t push either the CPU or GPU to their limits, so it is only useful as a proof-of-concept, and should not be used in order to compare the graphics/Javascript performance of browsers!

I’m very excited about this project, and this is only the beginning.  If you’re interested in this work, watch my blog for further posts about future demos!

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